Public Art Proposal Display

Art Proposals for the Westside Pump Station Public Art Project

Westside Pump Station image.jpgThe San Francisco Arts Commission is working with the Public Utilities Commission to commission a signature public artwork for the Westside Pump Station, located at the corner of Sloat Boulevard and the Great Highway. The newly commissioned artwork is intended to beautify and complement the architecture of the building, and will be part of the improvement project at the Westside Pump Station. Three artists were chosen as finalists by a Public Art Selection Panel to create site-specific proposals for this opportunity: Aileen Barr, Jet Martinez, and Jovi Schnell.

 

Untitled

by Aileen Barr

Barr- Westpump Art Proposal.jpgThe buildings function and close proximity to the ocean informs the theme of the artwork. The imagery is based on rhythmic patterns of water, waves and flows. These patterns explore the energy of water from a gentle flow to choppy waters and tumbling waves. The colors used, blues, greens and yellows relate to the site location dominated by ocean and sand. The patterns exude movement and plays against the rectilinear design of the building. The three bold designs are stylized in form and will have a strong visual presence from a distance.

The artwork will be located in three distinct bands around the tower and will be fabricated in handmade ceramic tile and mosaic. The rectangular shapes for each band of tile will be recessed into the concrete so that the tile is flush with the concrete finish.

The three distinct bands which wrap around three walls of the tower structure on the north, west and south sides.   Each band is approximately 3ft high and will be 20 ft long on the West side and 10ft long on the north and south sides totaling 360 sq ft approx.  Each band will be separated by approx. 3 ft. and the concrete finish of the building will be distinct between each band of tile.

The artist will fabricate the handmade tile in her San Francisco studio. The artwork will be made with a combination of handmade tile and commercial tile, which will be cut to size. The tile patterns will be assembled by the artist at her studio and glued onto polypropylene mesh. The mesh will be cut into sections, numbered and installed by a professional tile contractor.

The tile will be installed by a professional tile contractor, Fontanelli Tile, under the supervision of the artist. The artist has worked with Fontanelli on a number of installs. The contractor will provide scaffolding  and will prep and waterproof the area for tile. Laticrete  thin set and epoxy grout will be used as it is more durable than regular grout and ensure longevity. The artist will coordinate with the tile contractor for the installation.

The materials used for the project, high fire tile, thin set and epoxy grout will require minimum maintenance. Glazed tile does not discolor or fade and is easily cleaned  if it is tagged. The location of the artwork on the building will deter graffiti.

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Fog Lillies

by Jet Martinez

Fog Lilies is an art project composed of a series of hand painted murals which will adorn the upper areas of the West (Great Highway) and North (Sloat Ave) facing façades of the Westside Pump Station.

The design of the murals will feature a “stacked” floral composition, created by using gradient tones in a style reminiscent of embroidered floral patterns. The flowers featured in this particular design will be Cala Lilies, otherwise known as Alcatraz flowers. The Cala lily is a flower that is common throughout California. In San Francisco, it is prevalent in the Sunset District and Golden Gate Park. It is grown as a centerpiece in gardens, and also grows like a weed on the side of our roads. The Cala lily has been an inspiration in art and architecture of this region for centuries, from Mission era paintings, to the Cala Lily lamps in front of the De Young Museum.

The Cala lily is a simple and elegant flower that conveys a sense of purity and cleanliness. Fog Lilies is an artwork that aims to connect to a broader art and architectural tradition of incorporating natural elements into architectural forms to define the function of the building. In this case, the clean form of the Cala lily is meant to evoke a sense of purity which references the cleansing and treatment functions that the pump station performs.

The design is meant to integrate the elegant flowing lines of the Cala lily into the rectilineal architecture of the pump station. The color palette will feature colors which accurately represent the colors of the lily, but also evoke the often cool and overcast environment of Ocean Beach. The choice of soft grey/ green colors is meant to reference the cool colors of the concrete structure itself. The idea is that the murals will feel like part of the building, rather than images painted on the building.

This design draws from a style I have been developing for about 5 years. One of the primary inspirations for this painting style is embroidery patterns from the state of Oaxaca in Mexico. In recent years, I have worked with this type of patterning to try to create something new and evocative of other cultures as well. In doing so, I am trying to create new work that feels like traditional folk art that could be from anywhere; perhaps Mexico, or perhaps Nepal, or even the Bay Area.

With my newer mural projects, I have been trying to make work that integrates into the architecture and color scheme of the building. I’ve been aiming to make work that feels like it belongs on the wall. Instead of making work that pops off the wall, I’ve been working with the idea of making work that feels like it has lived on the wall for some time. This design is meant to be simple in concept, but with a complex process of painting. It is meant to have an enduring quality, light on narrative, and intended to integrate into the surrounding environment. It’s meant to be pretty as well.

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Flows A Switching Current

By Jovi Schnell

Through a combination of natural gravity and engineering the Hetch Hetchy water supply system flows to San Francisco to meet the sites coastal setting and the distinctive upwelling waters at Ocean Beach. The protected Snowy Plover symbolizes both the bird migration corridor at Ocean Beach as well as the mission statement of the forthcoming Ocean Beach Master Plan whose vision stands to steward environmental preservation and conservation of the area. The colors within the artwork have been drawn from the surrounding neighborhood to incorporate the unique and vibrant palette of the Sunset district (please see proposal board for colors).

The work aspires to celebrate what is at Ocean Beach and the unique water supply system that meets its shore at the Westside Pump Station. It also seeks to connect with and compliment the modern styled architecture of the new station and the existing sculptural artworks at the site. In a broader context the proposal of this mural offers a unique addition to San Francisco’s collection of mosaics that dot along its ocean side. From the historically inspiring tiles at the Maritime Museum, Beach Chalet, and Children’s Zoo to the more contemporary installations at the Bayview Boat Club, Channel Pump Station, Lincoln Park Steps and mosaic sails that mark the gateway to the Taraval neighborhood, just blocks from the Westside Pump Station.

A note towards the translation of the imagery into tile; this approach will be in the following manner: The frontal imagery (the rolling faceted waves of the water-system, bird, moon, star and upwelling tidal waters of Ocean Beach) will be cut into larger tile sections while the background colors will be cut into smaller sections. This approach to the imagery will make the primary imagery pop more boldly and create additional movement in the piece. I will be presenting a visual example of this in my presentation for the commission.

The concept for this proposal celebrates water and the life it brings. Through its imagery and materiality the work aspires to integrate into its site, landscape and neighborhood to offer a timeless artwork in relation to San Francisco’s history and future.

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Opportunity For Public Comment

Please take a few minutes to review these artwork proposals and provide feedback. Public comments will be considered by the Selection Panel as part of the Final Selection Panel meeting where the Panel will recommend one proposal for implementation. Please note that public comments do not constitute a vote.

The Final Selection Panel meeting will take place on Tuesday, May 16, 2017, 12 p.m. – 4 p.m. at 401 Van Ness Avenue, Room 125. All Artist Selection Panel meetings are open to the public. An agenda for the meeting will be posted 72 hours in advance of the meeting.

Comments may be emailed to sfacpublicartcomment@sfgov.org, or hand delivered/mailed to 401 Van Ness Avenue, Room 325 by Friday, May 12, 2017, 5:00 p.m.

What's Coming Up

Public Meeting

Street Artists Screenings

October 03
/
1:00 PM to 4:30 PM

War Memorial Bldg | Rm 125
Public Meeting

Street Artists Screenings

October 03
/
1:00 PM to 4:30 PM

War Memorial Bldg | Rm 125
Public Meeting

Street Artists Screenings

October 03
/
1:00 PM to 4:30 PM

War Memorial Bldg | Rm 125
Public Meeting

Street Artists Screenings

October 03
/
1:00 PM to 4:30 PM

War Memorial Bldg | Rm 125